A Level: Geography

Key Facts

Exam Board: Edexcel

Why Study Geography?

Geography is a highly topical subject, ever-changing and always relevant. Universities love the range of skills you develop, looking at data, understanding people and making connections to the world around you. It can lead to exciting job opportunities and develops your communication and thinking skills.

What will I study at A Level?

Paper 1 – ‘The Physical Paper’

This paper is a 2 hour 15 minutes examination and will test the students understanding and application of physical geography. The paper is 30% of the overall A Level. Topics that will be covered are:

  • Tectonic processes and hazards
  • Coastal Processes and Change
  • The Water Cycle and Water Insecurity
  • The Carbon Cycle and Energy Insecurity
  • Climate change futures

Paper 2 – ‘The Human Paper’

This paper is a 2 hour 15 minutes examination and will test the students understanding and application of human geography, this will cover a variety of topics across the human geography spectrum. This paper is 30% of the overall A level Topics that will be covered are:

  • Globalisation
  • Regenerating Places
  • Superpowers
  • Migration, Identity and Sovereignty

Paper 3 – ‘Synoptic Themes Paper’

This paper is 2 hours and 15 minutes and will test students around the compulsory synoptic themes. This will be bested around a geographical issue that will be rooted in two or more the compulsory themes in the course. The paper is with 20% of the A Level. The synoptic themes are:

  • Players – who are the stakeholders involved
  • Attitudes and uncertainties – people differing viewpoints and how this influences actions
  • Futures and uncertainties – How geographical decisions will affect the future.

Element 4: Non- examination assessment (NEA)

A core element of this section is 4 days of fieldwork. This is a piece of coursework that is between 3000-4000 words and is worth 20% of the assessment in the A Level. It will look at investigation process from start to finish. The focus is on one element of the specification and must include both human and physical elements. It looks at elements such as:

  • Data Collection
  • Data Interpretation – analysis and conclusions
  • Evaluative techniques
  • Secondary Data Research